Scootronics Hi Powered CDI

Anthony Tambs at Scootronics has just released a new CDI. This version is a high powered version with diagnostic LED’s.

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It has two diagnostic LED’s that will indicate a fault. The red LED indicates the Pick Up is working and the green LED indicates voltage is working from the Low Tension Coil.

Also incorporated into the CDI is a voltage controlled boost circuit, which Anthony says “I’m making use of the unused negative half cycle of the low tension signal. The voltage boost circuit is stabilized to 320 volts. This should give you a power rating of just over 100 millijoules.”

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Included is a Flexible HT lead, (which for me is one of the best ones I’ve used). When you’re bending it through the frame to the Spark Plug Cap there’s plenty of flexibility that will allow for movement. You need to get your own Spark Plug Cap. There are too many preferences out there for Anthony to cover.

I’ve never been able to get to grips with electrics, this CDI goes a long way to helping those like me, make the diagnosis of electrical faults easier.

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One last note to add. Lunchtime today, I went into town on the Lambretta. when I rode away to come home, it was spluttering badly unable to ride it, I checked the CDI diagnostic LED’s and they both light up. So within an instant, I was able to dismiss the Pickup or LT Coil. I changed the plug and it ran fine for the ride back home.

Contact with Anthony Tambs can be made on his Scootronics page on Facebook on the link below.
Scootronics Facebook Page

You can also look up the relevant information on the CDI and other Lambretta related info on the Lambretta Tuning Group on FB from the link below.
Lambretta Tuning Page on Facebook

 

Taylor Tuning Cowling Spacers

When building engines with longer conrods, you need packing plates. Sometimes it means that when fitting the cylinder cowling, you can find it doesn’t fit properly, sometimes it will under stress, which can lead to them cracking from their connections leading to loss of air for cooling

To help combat this Darrell Taylor of Taylor Tuning has made spacers of different sizes.

In the pictures, you’ll see before and after where I have the 3mm packer fitted to my 230 engine. There’s a gap before fitting the spacer.

You can contact Darrell on his Taylor Tuning Facebook Page here.

 

K2 Custom Classics Fork Compressor

When I rode to France in 2017, my Lambretta picked up a bit of an issue with the front end. When I got home I decided to take a closer look and strip the forks for a service (which doesn’t happen as often as it maybe should).

I didn’t fancy dropping the forks out completely as I don’t have a strong enough bench to hold them, so it involves trying to balance them and unless you have a friend to help, a third hand.

This is where the Fork Compressor from K2 Custom Classics comes in. Firstly it’s small. Secondly, forks can be stripped in situ. It works by clamping the unit to the fork leg and a bolt that runs through the unit with a U shaped piece at the bottom that fits over the spring. When you tighten the night the bolt rises compressing the spring. It’s as simple as that.

If you’re worried about scratching the paint. You can overcome this by wrapping some insulation tape around the area where the clamp fits before fitting the compressor.

It didn’t take long to strip the forks. The diagnosis was collapsed fork link buffers. So forks rebuilt handling was back as it should have been.

You can get the compressor from k2 Customs Classics

 

 

Under Panel Battery Tray

Last year I fitted a toolbox under the rear side panel. (You can read about it here).

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It carried a couple of bottles of oil and a couple of bits to France. When I got back one of the supports had snapped on the box, but it still held.

When I stripped the LI for an all-over service, I wanted to remove the battery from the legshield toolbox and move it to the back of the Lambretta. Dave Mayo May who has an FB page LamFab Scooter Fabrications. supplied his version of a battery tray for under the side panel.

It comes in Stainless Steel, in two parts. That means you don’t have to unbolt it from the frame strut to remove the tray for wheel changes etc. There’s a thumb screw that holds the tray to the support. (I used a bit of Loctite for added security). There’s also a Velcro strap and two Nyloc nuts & bolts, which bolt it to the rear frame strut.

You also get some sticky backed foam padding to absorb any rattle from the battery.

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As with all these rear fitting trays. Always make sure there’s clearance from the rear hub.

It’s been fitted for a while now and there have been no issues at all.

 

Airhawk Comfort Seat

The official wording is Airhawk Comfort Seating System. Some might just say it’s a cushion. Whatever you want to call it, it gets a lot of positive and very little negative feedback. I usually get by ok with the single saddles on my Lambretta, but for longer distances, like a lot of seats it can get uncomfortable.

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I received mine from SLUK UK in time for my trip to France last summer, so I was hoping for a good result as the trip was going to exceed 1,000 miles.

There are different versions with different shapes made to suit the seat on your scooter or bike. I got the medium cruiser for my single saddle.

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The cushion uses something Airhawk call Air Cell Technology, which basically is a number of air pockets connected to evenly distribute the air into the cushion supporting and spreading your weight evenly over the whole area.

Including is the cushion itself with a zipped cover that has a non-slip base and a couple of straps to connect it to the seat.

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For the best comfort for getting comfortable, you don’t just fill it with air using the valve. I went ahead and inflated the bladder, but then let out a small amount at a time until I got to the right point. This is usually when the cushion is deflated to the point, to where your bum is just off touching the seat of the scooter. Take a number of short journeys until you find the right inflation point.

It’ll feel a bit odd at first, but this is usually because it’s over inflated, but once you get the right point, you’ll not look back. It really is superb and an essential requirement, not just for the long runs. I use it for shorter trips and it merits its use.

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After the trip, apart from the usual aches and pains associated with riding all day. The Airhawk made a huge difference with no pain of the arse! It’ll be on my Lambretta for my tour through England, France, Belgium and Switzerland this summer.

Click here for the range of Airhawk Cushions on SLUK

Scootronics Intelli-Converter

Anthony Tambs of Scootronics has evolved and improved his Intelli-Converter into a decent box that will charge two devices at the same time.

The unit works with AC and DC supplies. With AC units it will convert to a DC supply to charge devices.

Not only does the Intelli-Converter charge it solves an ongoing problem experienced by many with SIP Speedometers. As published by Scooter Labs UK. Here’s the link to the page SIP Speedo Solution Article on SLUK.

The Intelli-Converter has a single M5 bolt with a flanged nyloc nut for fixing. I fixed mine into my Legshield toolbox, others have used the standard toolbox location. Dual USB points with rubber cover when not in use to protect the connection points.

It’s size is approximately 12cm X 6.5cm X 4cm

Fitting is really straightforward (I even managed to fit it without asking for Anthony’s help which is an accomplishment for me). The Intelli-Converter comes with simple fitting instructions.

The box has a light which flashes to let you know it’s connected and ready to charge. (Handy to know when you’ve an electrical issue and you’ll know if there’s power getting to the box).

There are comments from some who think it’s comparable to the Mod Charger, but they are not the same. The Mod Charger will charge a device, but that’s where it ends. It doesn’t supply voltage the same way as the Intelli-Converter, which supplies a steady 12 volts.

Chaincase Oil Sight Glass by Oiltek

The Oil Sight Glass lets you check your oil level without having to take out the oil level plug to see if you have enough oil in your engine.

They’ve been around before, but for a while, they always seemed hard to get a hold of, but Oiltek are selling the Chaincase Oil Sight Glass.

The window on this one is made of glass, but they do also come with a plastic window. It also has a piece of alloy behind the glass to make viewing of the oil level easier so you’re not struggling to see the level in the darkness of the engine.

A point to add. You do have to wait for the oil to settle after running the engine for obvious reasons.

You can order them here from Oiltek